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Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted Lanternfly is a new invasive species to our area. This leafhopper was first discovered in Berks County Pennsylvania in 2014. In a short amount of time the SLF has managed to spread out and is now being consistently spotted in our area. The adult SLF is most often seen with its wings closed giving a gray color with black spots on the wings. Sometimes they will present with the wings open and a red and yellow color can be seen on its hind wings and thorax. SLF has about 70 different host species, but it tends to prefer the Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus Altissima). Females will lay eggs up to twice a season and will lay 50-70 eggs at a time. Eggs sacks appear as small mud patches stuck to tree bark or any smooth surface. These can be found starting in October and will last through the winter. 

 SLF has sucking mouthparts that it inserts into plant tissues to remove the fluids it needs to survive. During feeding, SLF excretes significant amounts of honey dew (or sugar water). Honey dew deposits provide a food source for a sooty mold fungus that can grow on plant surfaces and fruit leading to reduced photosynthesis and plant vigor.